Think like a mountain.

Permaculture Workshop, Spring 2014

On Monday and Tuesday we learned to “think like a mountain.” During this semester’s permaculture workshop we split our time between philosophizing and digging, practicing Aikido and practicing fire building. We planted trees, established guilds and built water harvesting earthworks with the support of locals, visitors, businesses and nonprofits. Many thanks to Joel Glanzberg, Lillian Hill, and Jacobo Marcus for sharing their knowledge, passion and experience with us. Thanks to the Youth Garden Project for lending trowels to transplant lavender and yarrow. Thanks to Kara of Wildland Scapes for providing native plants and trees and being an invaluable local resource. Thanks to Steve Langello of Hazard County Bikes for being our enthusiastic homeowner and for trucking woodchips and providing cardboard for sheet mulch. Thanks to Tracy, Dana and Chris for working alongside us and sharing invaluable stories of their work on the Navajo Reservation. Thank you Sandy Mailliard for unending support! Phew!

Morning movements in Rotary Park, Moab. Get the mind and body aligned for a day of Permaculture principles and tracking exercises.

Morning movements in Rotary Park, Moab. Getting the mind and body aligned for a day of Permaculture principles and tracking exercises.

Building bows with a pattern mind (See Joel's website: www.patternmind.org)

Building a fire kit with a pattern mind (See Joel’s website: http://www.patternmind.org)

Founding director Emily Niehaus with Community Rebuilds advocate and supporter Sandy Maillard.

Founding director Emily Niehaus with Community Rebuilds advocate and supporter Sandy Mailliard.

Catching the wind in his tinder bundle.

Dan McCann, CR alum and current Construction Supervisor, catches the wind in his tinder bundle.

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Tracy, joining us from the Navajo Reservation where she works in community advocacy, catches the wind in her tinder bundle.

Jeremy Lynch (CR alum and campus design committee member) describes with space we'll be planting in.

Jeremy Lynch (CR alum and campus design committee member) describes the space we’ll be planting in.

Here current CR intern Josh Raff carries a native tree from Kara's truck. Kara Dohrenwend owns a local native plant nursery called Wildland Scapes (www.revegmoab.com) and partner organization Rim to Rim Restoration (revegetation.org).

Here current CR intern Josh Raff carries a native tree from Kara’s truck. Kara Dohrenwend owns a local native plant nursery called Wildland Scapes (www.revegmoab.com) and partner organization Rim to Rim Restoration (revegetation.org).

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CR alum and campus design committee member Claire Core presents the grand landscape plan to the group. We hope to build the campus landscape using permaculture principles in a way that is contextually relevant, provides for the students, the community, and local fauna and makes full use of limited available resources so that it may be inspiring, functional and enhance the student-intern experience. It's a mouthful. We're still working on that purpose statement!

CR alum and campus design committee member Claire Core presents the landscape design to the group. Over time, we hope to build the campus landscape using permaculture principles in a way that is contextually relevant, provides for the students, the community, and local fauna and makes full use of limited available resources so that it may be inspiring, functional and enhance the student-intern experience. It’s a mouthful. We’re still working on that purpose statement!

Noah places the first tree.

Noah places the first tree.

Jacobo leads us building a swale that will withstand monsoon conditions and help guide water through our food forest.

Jacobo leads us building a swale that will withstand monsoon conditions and help guide water through our food forest.

 

We make our holes as deep as the pot and twice as wide. For this planting we didn’t make any amendments to the soil directly in order to encourage our trees to adapt to native soil.

A beautiful apricot blossoms in its new home while swale builders carry on in the background. Once the tree is in the ground, we put one layer of cardboard, a thick layer of straw, and an even thicker layer of woodchip/leaf mulch. Then we top it with a hefty sprink of composted chicken or sheep manure that will seep through and feed the tree with regular watering and rain.

A beautiful apricot blossoms in its new home while swale builders carry on in the background. Once the tree is in the ground, we put one layer of cardboard, a thick layer of straw, and an even thicker layer of woodchip/leaf mulch. Then we top it with a hefty sprinkle of composted chicken or sheep manure that will seep through and feed the tree with regular watering and rain.

We placed rocks from the campus below each berm to use less dirt and make them stronger.

We placed rocks from the campus below each berm to use less dirt and make them stronger.

 

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Fruit tree and bee enthusiast Jacobo teaches us about pruning. So much of what we did that day was about working on a micro level while thinking on a macro level.

Fruit tree and bee enthusiast Jacobo teaches us about pruning. So much of what we did that day was about working on a micro level while thinking on a macro level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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